Author: prservices

Sales tax holiday approved for winter

During a special meeting on Monday night, members of the assembly passed a motion declaring the period of October 1, 2016, through March 31, 2017, as a “Sales Tax Holiday.” This ordinance is only applicable to retail sales. “Each cycle this is actually brand new. I know that it seems repetitive. But it’s a new thing. I hope we are clear that this is only retails sales,” said Finance Committee Chair Dan Henry via...

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Ho for the Klondike On Highway 98

Editor’s Note: The South Klondike Highway is not only the most scenic route to the Yukon and Interior Alaska, it also is a vital commercial link. You will be driving this highway with large trucks hauling various commodities, and large buses carrying other tourists.  Also watch for bicycle tours and sightseers. Drive safely and enjoy the ride. Mile 0.0 • FERRY TERMINAL. Straight takes you to historic Broadway, Centennial Park and the Klondike National Historic Park and city of Skagway Visitor Centers. Turn right or go straight to RV Parks. To head out of town, take Broadway until you see the Whitehorse signs, turn left on First Ave. one block to State Street, where a right turn puts you on the route out of town. 0.2 • CENTENNIAL PARK & ROTARY PLOW No. 1 • Follow the row of mountain ash trees, planted by our Skagway Garden Club in the 1980s, to the intersection of First and Broadway and Centennial Park. Dedicated in 1997 to commemorate our centennial years, the park’s focal point is the bronze statue of a Tlingit packer leading a gold seeker up the trail. It was sculpted by Chuck Buchanan of Carcross and  also contains signs directing pedestrians to their ship’s docks, and monuments to the Skagway National Historic Site, the first NWMP post in the north, and the pack animals on the Dead Horse Trail. Rotary Snow...

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WP&YR Train Guide

By Steve Hites The map of the railroad shows general characteristics of the route from Skagway to Bennett. Use the numbers to follow points of interest along the way. For further information about your location, railroad milepost markers are set up alongside the tracks at window height and are placed exactly one mile apart. Stations and points of interest also are marked with signs. Now that you’re set, enjoy your ride on the “Scenic Railway of the World.” 1 (Mile 0) • White Pass Co. Wharf/Broadway Cruise Ship Dock/Ore Dock. The “Summit Excursion” departs from these docks and the WP&YR depot daily during the summer. Newsies in 1898 costumes usually greet the ships and give the train a send-off. Look for restored Steam Engines No. 73 and 69, which pull some trains from the docks to town, or takes special steam excursions to Bennett and Fraser.  Diesel engines will take most trains up the mountain. 2 (Mile 0.3) • Skagway, Alaska, USA / White Pass Depot. “Gateway to the Klondike.” A city of 10-20,000 in 1898, Skagway’s downtown Historic District retains the flavor of the era. On 2nd Avenue stand the new and old White Pass depots. The new one serves as a company office and passenger terminal. Trains heading to Fraser, Bennett and Carcross leave from here. The old depot was restored by the National Park Service and...

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Wealth Woman: Kate Carmack and a Klondike Fortune Lost

By Deb Vanasse Before the Klondike stampede, before the purchase of Alaska, before the “discovery” of what came to be called the New World, the Chilkoot Trail was well-traveled by Tlingit traders. But following the 1896 discovery of gold at Bonanza Creek, the importance of these first travelers was nearly erased from popular lore. Enter Kate Carmack, first called Shaaw Tláa, a remarkable Tagish-Tlingit woman who played a significant role in the Klondike stampede and its aftermath. Married to George Carmack, an outsider who took credit for the Klondike discovery, Kate was also sister to Skookum Jim Mason, who...

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Klondike Gold Discovery Came in a Dream – Tlingit Storyteller

As told by Si Dennis Sr. from Skagway: City of the New Century I don’t know how authentic this story is. It was told to my brother and me years ago by my mother. The story is about the two Tlingit Indians who found the gold that started the stampede that was later known as the Klondike Gold Rush. It’s not the story of the gold rush itself, but events leading to the discovery of gold. The story goes like this. It seems that one of the men was out hunting one day, and during his travels through the woods looking for game, he came upon a pool of water.  He decided to rest by this pool, so he sat down. He noticed that this pool had high, steep sides, mostly clay, and it was awfully wet and slippery. And as he sat there, he noticed something moving in the murky water. He just sat there and watched it. It swam over to the side of the pool and started to climb out, and he noticed that it was a frog. Now the frog almost made it to the top before he slid back into the water. So the man just sat there and watched to see what he was going to do. The frog made several attempts with the same results, and he noticed that the frog was...

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